11
Jan, 2014

Boys and girls, the secret is out: playing video games can make you more creative. According to a study published by Michigan State University, the more people who play video games, the more creative they will be in different daily tasks.

Professor of Psychology of Michigan State University Linda Jackson confirmed that it is the first ever evidence-based study that showed the link between technology use and creativity. This is obviously welcome news because the Entertainment Software Association discovered that over 72 percent of the U.S. households play video or computer games.

Playing Computer Games is Better Than Watching TV

Dr. Daniel Johnson from Queensland University of Technology Games Research and Interaction Design Lab said that watching television is a ‘passive experience’. According to a study conducted by his team, adults are said to be better off playing video and computer games than spending a lot of time watching television shows. Johnson explained that video and computer games are interactive and allows players to develop their cognitive and problem solving skills. “There is a lot of negative press about gaming and that’s not well-supported. Where there is a negative effect, research shows it’s on the minority of people,” he said.

Video And Computer Games Develop Auditory and Visual Skills

Doctors Sue Fisher and Mark Griffiths wrote in the Journal of Gambling Studies that the video/slot/computer games can develop a series of characteristics in players. These include the provisions of auditory and visual rewards for winning moves; the rewards per correct behavior; self esteem; and attention or recognition through competition.

Video And Computer Games Are A Great Source of Friendly Competition

The study also discovered that the key determinant of a game’s enjoyment among movie themed computer games is competition. In fact the recent addition to Castle Jackpot’s movie themed slot games, Star Trek Against All Odds, has infused movie dialogues, cinematography, and references from the recent J.J. Abrams’ reboot. The game, according to International Game Technology, emulates the action-packed storyline of the movie-but with an arcade, skill-based twist that engages the brain and helps trigger many cognitive skills.

Additionally, such games feature high score tables which are pivotal to repeat plays, “as players attempt to not only beat their own score, but the highest score amongst their peers.” Says Karen Collins, et al. On Addictive Gameplay: What Casual Game Designers Can Learn from Slot Machine Research. All of these help aid competitiveness and creativity to overcome boundaries within the player.